History

2013

Cambridge Water becomes part of South Staffordshire Water Plc

2011

Cambridge Water sold by HSBC, which was acting as a custodian owner, to South Staffordshire Plc

2004

Cambridge Water sold to Cheung Kong Infrastructure Holdings

1999

Union Fenosa take over Cambridge Water Company Group

1996

On April 2, 1996 the company was re-registered at Cambridge Water PLC

1994

The Thetford pipeline became operations and a new reservoir at Madingley was completed

1991

Water was restricted for the first time ever as a result of the three year drought

1990

Privatisation of the water industry brought wide ranging new regulations

1989

From October 1989 all new connections were metered

1985 - 1987

The majority of the voting stock was acquired by the University, directors, staff and other local supporters of the company

1976

Throughout the 1976 drought, the company was able to continue with a plentiful supply of water, without the restrictions imposed on other areas

1963

On April 1, the company was required by Parliament to take over the water supply responsibilities of five local authorities and two bulk supply joint water boards

1955

Two more pumping stations were opened – Great Wilbraham in 1956 and Babraham in 1961

1941

Fulbourn pumping station was opened

1938

A two million gallon reservoir was constructed at Lime Kiln Hill

1935

The company was one of the first to introduce water softening voluntarily

1921

Fleam Dyke pumping station opened

1903

The company sought statutory powers to sterilise the water. The House of Lords refused consent

1890

Fulbourn pumping station was opened and a second reservoir built

1883

Additional wells were sunk at Cherry Hinton

1866

The company extended its area of supply to include the parishes of Girton, Great Shelford, Fulbourn, Madingley, Histon and Impington

1860

Supplies had been laid to 1500 premises and the company paid its first ever dividend of 1%

1855

The original waterworks at Cherry Hinton was opened on October 23

1853

The Cambridge University and Town Waterworks Act received the Royal Assent on June 14, 1853. This set up a company to supply fresh water to the town and university as a commercial enterprise

1852

Vice Chancellor Dr Richard Okes was instrumental in organising “a good honest company” to supply the town with water

1610

The University and Town constructed a channel from Nine Wells to the outskirts of the town, named after Thomas Hobson

1546

Henry VIII granted the pipe to Trinity College, feeding the fountain in The Great Court and a tap outside the Great Gate

1325

Monks of the Franciscan order laid a lead water pipe some 1.5 miles long from natural springs off what is now Madingley Road, in Cambridge to their monastery